Search results for "Pray and Obey"

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How Shall We Pray?

[…]peace for those who grieve, and relationships reconciled. But as I pray for those things, I pray first and foremost that the purposes of God be fulfilled and that glory be brought to our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. For through God’s purposes and glory, we will be bound to the One who loves us, to love and worship Him for eternity. No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither […]

The Line Officer and the Chaplain

[…]the members of the congregation need your spiritual vision, commitment, experience, involvement, and prayers. Join them and contribute to the Christian ministry in your command. Together you will mature in Christ (Ephesians 4:16). Chapel congregations contain military people who need to know more of a personal walk with the Lord Jesus. Some have never made a faith commitment to Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Others have never clarified and developed their faith so as to grow into mature disciples. In combat many will be open to the chaplains’ ministry who would otherwise be uninterested. In overseas duty stations a […]

OCF and Leadership

[…]leaders, or are we focusing on vision? Is the question going into an installation Pray, Discover, and Obey, “How many Bible studies do we need?” or is it,”How are we going to build Christian leaders…families…fellowships at our installation?” The first is a process question, the second is a vision-a leadership-question. Ephesians 4:11-16 talks about the leadership model of the church. God gifted some individuals to be apostles, others prophets, evangelists, or pastor/teachers. That is leadership. To what purpose? “…To prepare God’s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up…” (v. 12). Our purpose […]

Leadership and the Christian Officer

[…]obstacles as challenges rather than a cause for apprehension. The commander must be able to understand and analyze problems, make firm decisions, give clear orders and then forcefully carry out their will despite difficulties. There must be that character which is willing to accept responsibility, to reason out problems, make decisions and then push them through to success. Possessing this basic trait of character, they must then prepare themselves intellectually to face the tasks which confront them. Loyalty To achieve the best results from subordinates, the commander must have their confidence and personal loyalty. One thing must be remembered-loyalty starts […]

Finishing Strong, in Iraq and Life

[…]personnel at home and overseas, earning him the moniker “Combat Musician” from the troops and commanders. He has released nine CDs of his varied music. Danny and his wife, Angela, live in Colorado with their three children, the oldest of whom will graduate this spring from Colorado State University and will commission as an Army […]

TTP – Vision and Leadership

[…]the mission requirements we may face. Our business affairs must be in order, our families informed and prepared, and our accounts set straight so that we can focus our energies on putting forth our best effort-anytime, anywhere, on a moment’s notice. Together, we can provide exceptional service and support to all customer agencies to ensure mission success for our unit, our customers, and our nation. We will do this by focusing on training and readiness, all with our basis of performance and behaviors coming from the core values of “Integrity First,” “Service Before Self,” and “Excellence In All We […]

What you do and how you lead does matter

[…]the battle handoffs that our academy staff representatives do with training and operational commands, and the new military web portal are all tools to help keep you emboldened in your faith, falling out of habits and to find fellowship—and lay leadership—opportunities tailored to your specific needs and circumstances. After leaving the Coast Guard Academy, a newly commissioned officer arrived at his first assignment in Florida. With a vision for outreach into the local community, he wanted to help care for the homeless.  So he launched The King’s Sheep, a team of OCF members who team up with a local church. […]

Further insights from Mike and Angie Moyles

[…]in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope. And hope does not disappoint us.” Here are some more insights shared by Mike and his wife, Angie, during their interview with COMMAND. Read the full story here. Questions for Angie Mike credits you for his return to faith and rebaptism. What did you say or do that convinced this man of science? It wasn’t really anything I said or did. He asked me out—four times!—and I simply wouldn’t date him because I knew he was not a committed Christian and didn’t go to church. […]

Laborers and Laboring as Unto the Lord

[…]practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash” (Matthew 7:26-27). All of which underlines the real heart and core of celebrating workers and their work, particularly in the greater-than eternal economy of God’s full kingdom to come, “That is why we labor and strive, because we have put our hope in the living God, who is the Savior of all people, and especially of those who believe” (1 Timothy 4:10). Unlike 401(k) portfolios […]

Truth and the Christian Leader

[…]the other side. Leaders need not fear truth but must pursue it. Truth is the fabric of what we stand for and is what we as Christian leaders are called to practice.   Copyrighted by Officers’ Christian Fellowship and Larry Simpson. For personal reflection and growth. Not for […]

OCF Groups and You

[…]and large existing groups, such as at the military academies, with fellowship, Bible studies, and service programs for groups of generally homogenous cadets and midshipmen all under the OCF banner. Others experience OCF in the smaller venues of college ROTC programs, voluntarily led by retired, active duty, even college-age OCF members. In both instances, all the cadets/mids have to do is easily fit into the existing group, becoming consumers of OCF’s “product.” Becoming an owner means asking “What kind of OCF group needs to be at this location and what should I do about it?” rather than “Where is the […]
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